Heart failure is a chronic, progressive disease that occurs when the heart cannot pump enough oxygen-rich blood to circulate throughout the body. The reduced blood flow sets into motion a complicated sequence of responses originating from the kidneys. Blood pressure increases, the kidneys retain water and sodium, and fluids build up in the extremities of the body, lungs, and other organs. At the same time, fluid volume and pressure in arterial space decreases. Patients may have 30 to 40 liters of excess fluid in their body, but their intravascular space may be fluid depleted.

Every year, over 1 million patients in the United States are hospitalized due to heart failure.1  One in four is readmitted within 30 days.2 50% of patients who are diagnosed with heart failure die within 5 years of diagnosis,3 and one in nine deaths in the United States lists heart failure as a contributing cause.4 It is estimated that CHF currently leads to 10’s of billions of dollars in healthcare spending and is predicted to grow to 53 billion dollars by 2030.5 According to a study published in 2014, fluid overload is reported as the third most common cause of patient readmissions. 13.5% of post-cardiovascular surgical readmissions are from this condition.6

ADHF is a sudden onset of heart failure symptoms, which typically include difficulty breathing (dyspnea), swelling in the extremities, and fatigue. Current treatment for ADHF includes diuretic therapy that aims to restore healthy fluid levels in the kidneys and throughout the body. Diuretic therapy can be unpredictable and lose effectiveness as a patient’s condition worsens. In some patients, diuretics can trigger a condition called “diuretic resistance,” which blunts the function of diuretics and can worsen the severity of fluid overload, potentially resulting in acute kidney injury.

Launched at HFSA 2018!

Reprieve Cardiovascular

Reprieve Cardiovascular’s Guided Diuretic Therapy, using the RenalGuard Platform, is designed to manage fluids during diuretic therapy for patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (ADHF), and may relieve a number of symptoms related to this condition. The therapy has the potential to enable precise and predictable management of a patient’s fluid levels, guarding against dangerous fluid imbalances and enabling better control over diuretic therapy thus increasing the diuretic efficiency a patient experiences. Potential benefits include speeding decongestion while protecting core organ function, lessening of symptoms of CHF, such as shortness of breath, ascites, and swelling, reduced time in hospital, reduced readmission rates, and a better quality of life for the patient.

1 Blecker, S, et al, Heart Failure Associated Hospitalizations in the United States, J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Mar 26; 61(12): 10.1016/j.jacc.2012.12.038.

2 Mozzafarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, et al. on behalf of the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee. Heart disease and stroke statistics Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2015 Update: a report from the American Heart Association. 17 Dec 2014 Circulation. 2014;131:e29–e322

3 Mozzafarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, et al. on behalf of the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2016 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2016;133:e38-e360.

4 Mozzafarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, et al. on behalf of the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2016 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2016;133:e38-e360.

5 American Heart Association

6 Iribarne, A, et al. Readmissions After Cardiac Surgery: Experience of the NIH / CIHR Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network. Ann Thorac Surg. 2014 Oct; 98(4): 1274–1280.